The Pavlovian Society

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Photos of the Baltimore 2010 Meeting The Pavlovian Society is dedicated to the scientific study of behavior and promotion of interdisciplinary scientific communication. It recognizes the value of research at the molecular level but encourages members to stress the significance of their scientific observations to the whole functioning organism.

Thus, the Society fosters an integrative scientific approach and encourages scientists to adopt it in publications and in presentations. The Society's interest range from basic to clinical science activities. Its annual scientific meeting allows open and sometimes heated discussion of current issues in behavioral neuroscience and learning, at both basic and applied levels.

The Society also operates within a confederation of similar organizations, with a Pavlovian tradition, in Europe and the Orient.

To make a contribution to the Society, click here and enter the amount on the next page.

 

New: All images can now be viewed here.

History

The Society was established in 1955 by W. Horsley Gantt at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Early meetings were held in the Baltimore-New York area, but as the membership started to assume an international character, annual meetings were held abroad as well as through the United States. Membership includes physicians, PhDs, clinicians and scientists. Past presidents include Howard Liddell, Harold Wolff, B. F. Skinner, Stewart Wolf, Jr., Wagner Bridger, William Schoenfeld, Carmine Clemente, William Reese, Orville Smith, Gyorgy Adam, Herbert Kimmel, K. V. Sudakov, David Randall, Joseph Brady, Roscoe Dykman, Shoji Kakigi, John Furedy, Jaylan Turkhan, J. Bruce Overmier, Benjamin Natelson, Paul McHugh, Byron Campbell, Paul Rosch, Wolfram Boucsein, Tracey Shors, Michael Fanselow, Joe Steinmetz, Lou Matzel, Richard Thompson, Ralph Miller, Michael Domjan, Rick Servatius, Mark Bouton, and Peter Holland.

A particularly forthright examination of the Society's history is presented by

Membership

The Society has two membership categories: full members and student members.  Now that the Society's involvement with the journal has been discontinued (see below for details) the dues structure has changed.  Dues for 2007 are $30 for full members and post-docs. Student members pay $20.  In both cases payment of dues results in a reduction in the registration fee that you pay for the meeting if you choose to attend. 

Join by completing one of the forms below and mailing, faxing, or emailing it to Jeff Wilson.

Application for membership (html format)     Application for membership (Word format)

Pay dues (& meeting registration) at the bottom of the page.

Journal

In 2005 the Pavlovian Society made the difficult decision to end its affiliation with Integrative Physiological and Behavioral Science at the conclusion of the 2004 volume (vol. 39).  Transaction Periodicals Consortium, which owns the journal, has indicated that they intend to continue its publication.  We are investigating other publication options for the Society, including the possibility of an online journal, and welcome comments from the members regarding this issue.

A brief history of the Society's journal offerings to date (from www.indiana.edu/~ipbs - the web site for the journal established by its most recent editor, Joe Steinmetz):

Early in its history, the Pavlovian Society began publishing Conditional Reflex as an outlet for papers related to various aspects of Pavlovian conditioning. W. Horsley Gantt, the founder and first president of the Pavlovian Society was the editor of the journal. F. J. McGuigan took over as the editor of the journal in 1974 and changed its title to The Pavlovian Journal of Biological Science in an attempt to broaden the scope of the journal. The name of the journal was changed again to Integrative Physiological and Behavioral Science when Stewart Wolf became editor of the journal.

Meetings of the Society

Upcoming: